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Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. and always have. so does aarp, an organization serving the needs of americans 50 and over for generations. so it's no surprise millions have chosen an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they help cover some of the expenses medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands in out-of-pocket costs. to find out more, request your free decision guide. call or go online today. after all, when you're going the distance, it's nice to have the experience and commitment to go along with you. keep dreaming. keep doing. go long. starts with arthritis pain and a choice. take tylenol or take aleve, the #1 recommended pain reliever by orthopedic doctors. just two aleve can keep pain away all day. back to the news. >>> if it's crazy to call for putting police and arm security in our school to protect our children, then call me crazy. >> is wayne lapierre really crazy? you need a doctor to answer that question,
tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> we are certainly keeping a close eye on the fiscal cliff negotiations but the other big story we're following, secretary of state hillary clinton in a new york city hospital to be treated for a blood clot. the clot discovered in a routine follow-up exam yesterday following the concussion after a fall. nbc news robert bazell joins us now live. how's she doing? >> reporter: well, t.j., the actual truth to that is that we don't know. all we have is a statement from her office that says she has a blood clot, followed from the concussion. we don't know where it is. we don't know what kind of shape she is in. there's no dmfrinformation. the secretary's office said nothing more. a lot of doctors i have talked to about this c
but with so much health care noise, i didn't always watch out for myself. with unitedhealthcare, i get personalized information and rewards for addressing my health risks. but she's still going to give me a heart attack. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wonder so many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. >>> okay. moments from the closing of the trading year, it's a rally we got underway right now. let's check in with mary thompson here on the floor of the exchak. >> a good rally and an end to e the five-day losing streak as the dow looks to have a move to the upside 135 points. dow's up about 6% for the year. one of the reasons for that is the gains in bank of america, the best performing stock in the dow up ove
of public healthcare says that a single mother with two children is better off taking a job that pays $29,000 a year than a job that pays $69,000 a year. why? because of entitlements. joining us from our fox anchor stewio lou dobbs. explain this for us, please. we have got to give great credit to the public pennsylvania. i know then federal government as do you would listen. think abouigt these benefits being receiveded by this woman. 25,000 and take home salary of $57,000, you add to that go through whether it's child care or whether it is transportation. two children in pennsylvania. foot stamps amounts to a subsidy of $6,300 a year to that family of three. medicare and child health insurance. $16,500 a year. section 8 subsidized, low income rent. another 4300. s earned income tax credits. modestly $5,000. they could rismoe significantly beyond that but at any rate. they would total so much money, combined with the -- national school lunch m program, needy family assistance programs, we're talking about more take home pay, disposable income for that woman with her two children on publi
. there are the markets for health-care -- they are the markets for health care, and the market for health itself. the health-care market is what you think of as drugs, pharma, hospitals, doctors. in the u.s. we have in quotes, health reform. things are turning toward people -- keeping people healthy rather than treating them when they're sick. the drug companies are going to continue to win because they cannot charge enough money for drugs. the insurance companies are going to whine because they have to treat people that are sick as opposed to just a healthy ones they. it will figure out how to align their incentives without -- the government is not tgoing to pay [inaudible] to change their processes to improve that kind of thing. that will continue over. -- overall, it is pretty good but do not expect any changes. the market for bad health, companies are beginning to understand the need to permit out healthy food. they're going to put new additives in the same old bad food. now you have fruit bars with yogurt, or candy with fiber. watch out for more of that. it is hard because there is the huge
... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> you're in "the situation room." two breaking news stories we're following. secretary of state hillary clinton is hospitalized with potentially serious blood clot in her head. doctors have just revealed the location. also, america is just hours away from a massive tax hike and spending cuts, heading over the dreaded fiscal cliff. president obama says an agreement, though, is within sight. republican-led house of representatives, though, will now wait till after the country goes after that fiscal cliff at midnight tonight before coming up with
and reform entitlements looking at the health-care programs and retirement programs, which are under real stress. any plan has to look at all parts of the budget. the fiscal cliff is an across- the-board whack and that would put us back into recession. we can protect people that depend on these programs and so that we do raise significant revenues. we believe any plan has to be a bipartisan. it is about the country. it's interesting is how many people have stepped forward and saying to congress, stop making the situation worse. if you make the hard choices, the campaign to fix the debt will be there. a group of people are saying we support you in making hard choices. so far, we do not see that fix in place. there is real risk to the economy if we wait too long. host: you spend some time on wall street. the market was down on friday. could it happened this week? guest: anything could happen this week. the markets don't know what to make about what is going on on capitol hill. we do not know what kind of deal is going to come out of this. it seems impossible the deal will be big enough to h
with and things we use including broadcast media, and health-care are rooted in scientific discovery and technological innovation. there has to be a greater appreciation for their role of science and technology in society. and we have to get young women engage early. we found at the university that if women are engaged in experimental work it makes a big difference. we try to create an intergenerational system but as a leader of a university when young women come up through the ranks and come forward through the promotion and tenure process we have to ensure fairness. it is a complex problem and that is why it is hard for people to talk about it. >> why is it important there are more women in science? >> it is important there be more scientists. we are about to face what i call the quiet crisis. you have a number of scientists in this country who came of age in the post sputnik era as i did and beginning to retire and those retirements are going to accelerate over the next few years. the second invariables that people talk about when we talk about age 1 bb depends very strongly on im
they did not have to do before. you have to choose your pension plan, your healthcare plan, paper or plastic. you have everything thrown in your lap, and maybe most important is the information you choose to consume. you are what you eat. if you eat nothing but chocolate pudding your entire life, then you can venture out there and very your diet. it is all there. there are so many times when i have spoken in public forums and people will say, why are the media not covering x? how did you find out about that? it was on page 6, but they thought it should be on page one. the media you consume are not reflecting your priorities. they are run by people. if you go straight to google news, you can have an algorithm doing that search for you. i think you just have to swallow hard, do a lot, and realize this is all up to you now. i am not startling for the world that was at all. >> that task of leaving it up to you can be kind of frightening. >> you have to find people you can trust. when you watch cbs or it read the new york times, those were your agar gators. i talk to people -- those we
in the healthcare law to providers. 50 million people rely on this program. it benefits individuals over the age of 65. a lot of people depend on it. host: what is the current budget for medicare? guest: about $550 billion for this year. host: does that include the premiums that seniors pay? guest: what they pay it will go to the payments that will go to the doctors that care for the beneficiary. host: how much is coming out of general revenue? guest: the beneficiaries pay 25% of the program in part b. in part d, you have about 32 beneficiaries that are on the program. host: medicare is divided into four parts. part a is hospital insurance. host: how did the affordable care act change medicare? guest: it will take $716 billion away from medicare providers. the payments will still grow. providers of care will see their reimbursements decrease. beneficiaries receive some new services. they will get some help if they are enrolled in the drug program. they will be helped to close the donut hole. host: how is medicare being looked at? guest: medicare providers will be cut by 2%. providers will be cut
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)

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